Status and Scope of Hydroponics in India

(Hydroponics – Growing Plants Without Soil)

Indian population is growing day by day, with this huge speed the challenges of meeting food needs also need to set its pace high is equally important. One way of meeting future food needs could be hydroponics – growing plants without soil, instead using a nutrient-rich solution to deliver water and minerals to their roots.

Indian population is growing day by day, with this huge speed the challenges of meeting food needs also need to set its pace high is equally important. One way of meeting future food needs could be hydroponics – growing plants without soil, instead using a nutrient-rich solution to deliver water and minerals to their roots. Despite sounding like something out of science fiction, it’s nothing new. The Aztecs built floating farms around the island city of Tenochtitlan, and the explorer Marco Polo wrote about seeing floating gardens during his travels through 13th-century China. In conventional methods, plants are grown in the soil but in hydroponics, plants are grown and kept uptight in ionic compound solution. This nutritional efficiency makes the plant more productive. What hydroponics does best is eliminating the need for soil, sunlight and rain. Since almost 90% of pests come from the soil, there is automatically a dramatic reduction in pests. Hence fewer pesticides, herbicides and insecticides are used. Advantages of hydroponics: Space saver. Effective use of plant nutrients. Water-efficient. No weeds, fewer pests, and plant diseases. Stable and higher yields. Control of the whole system. Growing media can be chosen and sterilized fast. Fewer fertilizers and insecticides used. Easy to transplant. Able to grow crops all year round. While it's hard to predict the future, it's easy to state the present state: hydroponic farming is as popular in India as it is on the moon. Most of the time, farms are owned by individuals hovering around the poverty line who work on the farm as well. Their lack of knowledge, lack of investment and lack of willingness to move out of their comfort zone all influence the unpopularity of hydroponics here. And a majority of farmers doesn’t even know that something like hydroponics exist too. The cost for setting up hydroponics across hundreds of acres would not be cheap, around a Crore Rupees. However there are possibilities of reduction of cost through improvisation. But as a whole it is much expensive than the conventional method. Hydroponics in itself is a great technique for increasing agricultural production in the country. This phenomenon is not meant to be adopted in rural areas of India as of now, but it’s an excellent farming technique that can be adopted in urban areas. People can use hydroponics in their homes while doing kitchen farming, terrace farming or gardening. They can enjoy the benefit of fresh chemical free products, simultaneously this will reduce pollution as well thus eliminating chances of diseases. As it needs low sunlight and can be grown in normal light, it can be efficiently use inside homes as well. Hydroponics encourages urban farming in an efficient manner.

GREEN TV LIV
play

Ajay Naik, CEO- Letcetra Agritech Pvt Ltd talking about hydroponics technique On Green TV

Get these articles in your inbox, monthly.
RELATED ARTICLES

Agricultural production is not a miracle. It take Knowledge, Labour and Character.